About

Hi.  My name is Graham and I have decided to right a journal about my hearing loss problems and my current adventure into the possibility of getting a Cochlear Implant.

I am 36 years old and am married to my gorgeous wife Vicky.  Together we have had two beautiful daughters.  Lucy 22 months & Jasmin 10 months!Yes I know.  That’s only 12 months between them you say.  Well, we loved having Lucy so much we couldn’t wait to have another one as soon as possible.

We live in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.

I run my own small business, which is a gym specialising in Personal Training on a 1 to 1 basis or in groups of up to 4.

Now, check out the rest of my blog for my hearing loss story so far……

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  1. good to meet you graham
    i just ssaw your story on SeeHear and found your blog. its very intresting 🙂
    hope the operation goes well in may! and i will keep reading your updates! ive had my cochlear implant for 16 yrs now. 🙂

    • Hi Laura. Thanks for the message. I have just been looking at your blog too. Really good helpful stuff. You’re are obviously an experienced CI user so it’s great to get your input into how well they work.
      I will add your blog to my list if you don’t mind as I’m always on the look out for goog ones like yours.
      Best wishes,
      Graham

  2. Hi Graham, came across your blog from the See Hear web site and thought I’d drop you a line as we’re around the same age and i too have a young daughter. Have read some of your blog and have found it very interesting. I’m a CI user too and have the AB like you have chosen, was implanted last June and switched on in July. I have a progresssive hearing loss inherited from my father, we’re born with full hearing which gets worse over the years and 4 years ago I had to stop using the phone and listening to music, it became obvious that a CI was the only way to go as I could get nothing more from hearing aids. Since the switch on my life has changed dramatically and I’m sure yours will too, I began using the phone again approx 5 months after switch on and started listening to music again straight away. Things don’t sound as they did, but it’s become 100% better than it was, I think the shorter the time between losing your hearing and switch on helps. My Dad’s now going through the process in the hope of being implanted at the age of 75! Good luck with the op and the switch on, be patient and my advice is keep busy after switch on, don’t analyse everything, just get on with your life, there will be lots of nice surprises!

    • Hi Verity. Thanks very much for your message. It’s really nice to hear how you have got on. Oh to hear music again and be able to use the phone!! I have been told that I should do reasonably well as I only lost my full hearing recently, although they are operating on the side that I haven’t had any use of for the last 10 years. Do you just use the CI or can you still use the HA for your other ear too? They want me to try both but everyone I have spoken to seems to think that wont work. Your advice about getting on with my life is great as I dont think I will have much option with two young daughters and being self employed. Life must go on as they say 🙂
      Thanks again for your message and fingers crossed for your Dad.
      I look forward to lots of surprises 🙂
      How do you find social situations now??
      Graham

      • Hi Graham, I use an HA on the other side, for balance of sound as I don’t get much clarity out of that ear now as the CI has taken over, which they said it would do, but I find with a CI you can’t hear 2 sounds at once, so the HA helps there, plus with all the sound coming in one ear it’s hard to work out where the sound is coming from, so again the HA helps. I had my weaker side implanted so that I had my stronger ear for listening between the op and switch on, so don’t worry about having the side you are having done, done, you will be fine! As for social situations, it’s definitely better than it was, I don’t go out that much(no time!) so I’ve not really put it to the test. My daughter was 5 months old when I had the op, I was working part time and went back to work 2 weeks after the op, I was so busy there was no time to sit back and analyse what I was hearing really, it’s been lovely to say to my husband ‘Ooh, did I just hear such and such!’
        Verity

  3. Hi Graham
    I’ve had progressive sensorineural deafness through Menieres for (ahem) many years (say it quickly and you’ll get the “ahem”!). I’m not bothered; life is good. I read lips, sign and speak. I’ve got a question for you. I’ll tell you my thing first though; I often avoid people who I knew when I was able to hear better because they have such difficulty in accepting my deafness and adapting to a new way of talking to me… sometimes I just can’t be bothered with the effort. Have you found yourself doing that? How have you dealt with your family? My brother can’t ever accept my deafness and makes no allowances for my communication (or lack thereof) at all. Husband and offspring are fine though and we muddle through splendidly. How have you approached your sudden loss with friends, family, work colleagues, the woman in the newsagents….? Best of luck with the CI 🙂

  4. Hi Graham, came across your blog from the See Hear web site and thought I’d drop you a line as we’re around the same age and i too have a young daughter. Have read some of your blog and have found it very interesting. I’m a CI user too and have the AB like you have chosen, was implanted last June and switched on in July. I have a progresssive hearing loss inherited from my father, we’re born with full hearing which gets worse over the years and 4 years ago I had to stop using the phone and listening to music, it became obvious that a CI was the only way to go as I could get nothing more from hearing aids. Since the switch on my life has changed dramatically and I’m sure yours will too, I began using the phone again approx 5 months after switch on and started listening to music again straight away. Things don’t sound as they did, but it’s become 100% better than it was, I think the shorter the time between losing your hearing and switch on helps. My Dad’s now going through the process in the hope of being implanted at the age of 75! Good luck with the op and the switch on, be patient and my advice is keep busy after switch on, don’t analyse everything, just get on with your life, there will be lots of nice surprises!
    +1

  5. […] more information on Graham’s journey check out his Deaf Blog which makes for interesting […]


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